Monthly Archives: April 2013

Hotel Industry in India – Some Correlates between Prices and Macro Economic Issues

By Dripto Mukhopadhyay

Hospitality has become one of the major businesses in the India. Large number of international brands has entered the sector in recent times. The sector has been marked with increase in number of premium segment hotels in different parts of the country, along with smaller ones that cater the need for the middle class and lower middle class domestic tourists. In this particular blog, I would restrict myself in highlighting a few crucial attributes of the hospitality sector in India and some of the consequences thereof.

To start with let’s look at some of the macro economic indicators relating to hospitality sector. As obvious, hospitality sector includes hotels and restaurants. Though apparently this should include informal sector also, as the norm goes in national accounting system, data pertaining to this sector majorly reflects the trend of the registered sector because of sheer nature of the sector. Gross Domestic Product (GDP) relating to hotel & restaurant sector is presented in Figure 1. The visual presents the GDP of the sector at 2004-05 prices and the share of hotel and restaurant sector to total GDP of the country from 2000-01 to 2011-12. It is evident from the graph that hotel and restaurant sector GDP has increased to 3 times during the last decade starting 2000-01. It showed a gradual increasing barring the period 2008-09 and 2009-10 as the period was marked with global economic recession. However, the share of the sector in total country GDP rose till 2007-08 significantly and since 2008-09 suffering a dip followed by a stagnating share. This is a reflection of happenings in the world economy as well as of the Indian economy. Though apparently India recovered quickly enough from the recession, due to some of the fiscal measures by the Central Government, but the recovery was quite brittle in nature. It has become evident from high GDP growth registered soon after 2008-09, but poor GDP growth during last couple of years. Poor performance of industry sector, majorly due to reduced demand from domestic market, led the slow down.

However, investment in hotel and restaurant sector was not hampered by timid GDP growth during recent years. Gross Fixed Capital Formation (GFCF) in hotel and restaurant sector and its share in total GFCF of the country is given in Figure 2 below. There was a steady growth in investment in this sector, especially since 2003-04. The momentum dampened a little during the year 2008-09, but picked up again and has shown steep growth. The red line in the graph Continue reading

Price Index for Hotel Industry in India

By Dripto Mukhopadhyay

Whenever someone wants to work on estimating tourism demand or look into issues related price impact on tourism, price of accommodation is a crucial one to incorporate in analysis. In India lack of any time series on accommodation prices was a serious bottleneck for researchers who wanted to look into these relationships. Measuring price sensitivity is crucial for predicting tourism behaviour, be it domestic or international or for any specific country per say. This article tries to bridge that gap in a systematic manner through constructing a Hotel Price Index (HPI) for India. This HPI has taken care of different categories of accommodation also. In general, hospitality service providers are categorized into following by ministry of tourism as well as well accepted among the industry players:

  • Five star deluxe
  • Five star
  • Four star
  • Three star
  • Two star
  • One star
  • Heritage
  • Others

Heritage hotels have become popular during last decade or so. Whereas several other accommodation services are available currently, that cannot be categorized under anyone under star categories or heritage category such as service apartments, paying guest accommodations etc, which are clubbed under the category of others. An HPI at India level should represent all these categories and also should cover different corners of the country to be considered as a representative Index for hotel prices in India. The HPI presented in this article has used HVS data sets. Though HVS data is a robust one in terms of coverage, however, it captures information from 40 odd cities in India. Therefore, to some extent this HPI may be considered as slightly over-estimated one. The reason being hotels in remote areas, especially that are not well known tourist destinations, might have lower rates than that captured from the cities covered under the said survey. Continue reading

Inbound Tourism to India Affected Badly due to rape Incidences? – The Answer is NO

By Dripto Mukhopadhyay

Last week, suddenly I saw an article on the Indian tourism in one of the newspapers of a European country. The article cited a report by Assocham Social Development Foundation (ASDF). The news indicated that foreign tourist inflow into India has gone down by 25% in the last three months of the year in the wake of rape incidents. It struck me at that point itself since it is quite an unlikely proposition for anyone who has done some work on Foreign Tourists Arrivals (FTA) in India and its driving forces. By now, I have seen this news in several Indian newspapers also citing the same source ASDF. Being a researcher with keen interests in tourism development, especially in India, I was quite perplexed and could not really grasp the situation which is beyond all theoretical construct of tourism demand. The reason being terrorist attacks, rapes, incidences of other law and order problems have their impacts on tourism, but to a much lesser extent. Is it believable that suddenly the demand function of tourism has changed drastically to make such an adverse impact of some rape incidences that has been highlighted because of media attention? Continue reading